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Feb 23, 2018
11:15 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I think that The Catcher in the Rye was a very well written novel. Although, sometimes I had trouble following Holdenís digressions, however I think most people did at some point, and it really added to Holdenís character. I could connect with Holden at a lot of points in the novel, and found his personality to be similar to either myself or others that I know. However, I think that Holden was a little too mean at some points. For example, when he randomly tries to punch Stradlater. I wish that he hadnít done that so that it was maybe a little bit easier to sympathize with him. I really liked the concept of the red hunting hat as his way of protecting himself. I think that a lot of people have similar ways of doing that, less figuratively however. Overall I really enjoyed the book.

catepeoples21@marist.com
c


Feb 23, 2018
11:15 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I think that Holden was too much of a nub scrub sometimes. I mean at first I was all into it, liking Holden since some of the decisions made reflected mine and the people around me, but then it just got to the point where Holden was just acting stupid on a regular basis. After a while, I kind of got tired of his digressions and his always contradictory actions and thoughts. Holden is a paradox, and reading a paradox for 250+ pages gets annoying after a while. Other than that, I think that the book was pretty good and reflected real life issues and struggles that kids and other people face today. For example, the whole part about the phoniness and everything is pretty good because these days especially, many people act fake and are phonies, meaning that you donít know who you can trust. Also, I liked the theme about the loss of innocence because sometimes, I wish I simply had my innocence back and could simply be like a little kid again. Again, with Holden, one thing I didnít like about him was the fact that he was a phony himself, yet he always called everyone else a phony. I think you have to be true to yourself and have to admit when youíre in the wrong, something Holden refused to do and failed to do time and time again throughout the book. The book is definitely better than some other books Iíve had to read in the past *cough cough* Fahren *cough* heit 451. The characters actually reflected real life people and how people in the real world would act. I feel like sometimes authors lose touch with reality because of the world they have created in their books. Itís just like the play Holden was talking about where everything worked out in the end and how everyone married each other and how the guy who was madly in love with the poor woman finally ended up marrying her. Yes, sometimes the world does work like that; everything is perfect, everybodyís happy, everyone is smiling and laughing at the end of their journey. But usually, itís a dark world where people are disappointed, people fall in and out of love and hearts are broken, people die or leave someoneís life, and even though there may be some silver lining in the end, you usually wish that you could simply take it all back, go back in time, and with the knowledge you now know, start to make your decisions. Thatís why they say hindsight is 20/20.

-Sincerely,

Quanlatryquaviuslamatyrekiushugo

Quanlatryquaviuslamatyrekiushugo@HOTMAIL.com
Quanlatryquaviuslamatyrekiushugo


Feb 23, 2018
11:15 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I enjoyed reading The Catcher in the Rye because I think that you captured some of the feelings of a teenager very well. I have not experienced the same things that Holden has, but I think that the characteristics of a depressed sixteen-year old who has lost a brother were captured very well in this writing style. I liked that the book was written from Holdenís perspective because it made the story seem more real. The theme of alienation as a form of self-protection shows the true nature of a growing teen. If I had to say one thing that I disliked about the book, it would be the ending. Throughout the story, Holden talks about his family and he talks about when he is going to go home, but the reader never meets his mother or father. As a reader, I felt a lot of anticipation as Holden travels through New York because I wanted to read about him going home to his parents. I wanted to know how his parents reacted to Holdenís expulsion from Pencey Preparatory School but instead the book ended very suddenly. Aside from the ending, the book was entertaining and different.

student@marist.com
g


Feb 23, 2018
11:17 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I recently read The Catcher in the Rye in my English class. While I enjoyed the more realistic views on teenagers and what they are thinking about, I was often annoyed by Holdenís inability to learn from his mistakes. It makes it hard to read a book when the main character is so unlikeable. Holden was very childish and immature which contrasted with his sometimes very deep and incisive thoughts and connections. It made it very confusing to the reader, because I could never decide if Holden was acting dumb or if he actually was dumb.

I also wished that the book covered a greater span of time. I wanted to see where Holden was now and I also wanted to see if any help he received he was able to use. He seemed to have a very fragile mental state that was crumbling by the end of the book. I loved his family descriptions of his parents, Phoebe and D.B., and I wished we were able to meet them more and see what they were like. His family dynamics interested me a lot, I wanted to see if they were as affected by Allieís death as Holden was.

Additionally, the concept of phoniness was interesting for a little while but it grew annoying by the end. Holdenís continued use of one loose term was constantly used to justify his feelings on people. It would have been more interesting to see what he would have done without it, he might have kept an open mind longer and could learn from or be friends with different people.

Overall, I enjoyed the book. Holdenís ramblings sometimes went on for a while, but I liked the story line and most of the characters. It was a good, honest view into the life and ramblings of a teenager.



student@marist.com
student


Feb 23, 2018
11:17 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I did not like The Catcher in the Rye. The main character, Holden, bothered me very much. He was very annoying. One thing specifically he did that annoyed me was when he would call other people phony and judge other people. He did this throughout the book, but he did not see his own flaws. He also was very whiny. He gave up very easily and would never blame himself. He would just wine about it. I dislike Holden because it is clear that his parents want the best for him even though he himself does not. His parents always pay for him to go to nice boarding schools like Pencey, but he does not take advantage of the opportunities he is given. He flunks out of every school he goes to because he does not even bother to try. He always wastes his parentsí money, then he blames it on the teachers or cliques for making him fail. In addition, he wastes his own money. He is always spending his cash on things that he should not. He has no sense of responsibility when it comes to money or anything for that matter. He spends and wastes his money without a care in the world. I also do not like Holden because of the way he likes to pretend about things. One thing he did that really annoyed me was when he pretended like he was shot. It seemed so immature and stupid. He got himself into a serious situation with Maurice, but he did not feel the need to take it seriously. I also did not like the digressions throughout the book. I feel that they made the book boring and tedious to read. Holden constantly went off on side tangents. This inability to stay with one idea throughout a passage caused me to dislike this book. However, I liked the use of symbols in the book. I like how all of the symbols added another layer to the story and to the characters.

student@marist.com
D.M.


Feb 23, 2018
11:18 AM

Dear J.D. Salinger,

I have recently completed your book, The Catcher in the Rye, and I have a few thoughts. First of all, well done on capturing what it is like to be a teenager in high school. In the beginning of the book, Holden expressed some of the same thoughts that I have all the time. Another aspect of the book that I liked was the symbols. It was very easy to follow the symbolsí meanings, and they described how Holden was feeling at the moment. If I may be honest, I wish there Jane Gallagher actually spoke to Holden. I could relate to this book much easier if there was a reoccuring, average teenage girl in it more. Jane Gallagher, with such a complicated backstory, was a fascinating side-subject, and everytime Holden talked about Jane, I was drawn in by how Holden opened up. Having Jane actually speak in the book would help us to understand Holden more. Holden was in love with her and he showed this feeling to us through his stories about Jane. I guess what Iím saying is that I truthfully wish there was more closure in Holdenís story. All Jane needed was just one chapter, and it would have been a symbol for hope. I really like happy endings, and unfortunately, we donít know how Holdenís story ends. However, I believe if Jane had come back and said a few words to Holden at the end, the novel would have closed on a hopeful, happier note.

Thank you!

Sofia M

sofiamacaluso21@marist.com
Sofia M


Feb 23, 2018
11:20 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I feel that the book The Catcher in the Rye was a decent book with both good and bad. First, I think that some of the symbolism used seemed very unorthodox. I do not think that putting a hat on would change the way someone feels and make them want to be alone. Also, who is thinking about where the ducks in the lagoon go when the water freezes. I feel that people find books more enjoyable when they can relate to the main character, but with Holdenís actions and personality, it seemed difficult to connect with him. Also, I feel that you should have put more of Phoebe in person throughout the book because I was disappointed when Holden gives a great description about her, and we do not see all of it. I would have like a face to face encounter with D.B. to see if he is truly what Holden says he is or if Holden is exaggerating. Another thing I would have liked to see was meeting between Holden and his parents once they found out he was asked to leave another school. However, there were many positives as well. For instance, I enjoyed Phoebe as a character. She truly lightened up the story after it being very dark. I also liked your writing style. You were not afraid to curse to express something, but you did not say the ďfuck youĒ in every sentence. In conclusion, I think this was a good book that could have been better with a few minor tweaks.

michaelwilson21@marist.com
Michael Wilson


Feb 23, 2018
11:22 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I recently read The Catcher in the Rye in my English class. While I enjoyed the more realistic views on teenagers and what they are thinking about, I was often annoyed by Holdenís inability to learn from his mistakes. It makes it hard to read a book when the main character is so unlikeable. Holden was very childish and immature which contrasted with his sometimes very deep and incisive thoughts and connections. It made it very confusing to the reader, because I could never decide if Holden was acting dumb or if he actually was dumb.

I also wished that the book covered a greater span of time. I wanted to see where Holden was now and I also wanted to see if any help he received he was able to use. He seemed to have a very fragile mental state that was crumbling by the end of the book. I loved his family descriptions of his parents, Phoebe and D.B., and I wished we were able to meet them more and see what they were like. His family dynamics interested me a lot, I wanted to see if they were as affected by Allieís death as Holden was.

Additionally, the concept of phoniness was interesting for a little while but it grew annoying by the end. Holdenís continued use of one loose term was constantly used to justify his feelings on people. It would have been more interesting to see what he would have done without it, he might have kept an open mind longer and could learn from or be friends with different people.

Overall, I enjoyed the book. Holdenís ramblings sometimes went on for a while, but I liked the storyline and most of the characters. It was a good, honest view into the life and ramblings of a teenager.

student@marist.com
student


Feb 23, 2018
11:22 AM

Dear J.D. Salinger,

For the past few weeks in my English class I have been reading one of your timeless novels, The Catcher in the Rye. The book, since the 1950ís when it was released, stirs up great amounts of controversy for explaining the raw, uncensored feelings of a modern teenager. The general emotional connection to teenage development persists even today, the feelings felt by Holden are still extremely present widely spread across todayís teenagers sixty years after Holden was thought of. The novel deeply dove into great detail about what Holden was feeling, taking a break from the often rowdy storytelling from Holden to explain his deeply rooted psychological complexes that drive his action, or lack thereof. Though some would be set aback by the tangents and whiplash-esque storytelling by Holden, I find it impressive that the individual trains of thought from our protagonist could fall so deep into human condition and the collective issues all people face as a result of ďgrowing upĒ. The characters in the story, though intentional or not, reflect greatly upon the individual events and troubles that the modern teenager faces. The emotional attractiveness of Jane, the anger towards Stradlater, the emotional unavailability shown to Sally, even the encounter with the nuns evokes a feeling of respect and even pity upon noticing their inability to go to lavish places to eat.

On the contrary, I do see some pressing issues in the story of Holden and his trek across his home city. Symbolism, though great overall in the novel, seems to come and go, with only few of the potentially riveting symbols and metaphors lasting deeply for only a few chapters before becoming very shallow. A great example of this is the ducks in Central Park, there was a lot of potential with this theme that could have been funneled into the later parts of the novel, but the ducks were only lightly touched upon in Holdenís drunken journey across Central Park. The emotional allegory seen with the museum theme (which was amazingly used later into the book), could have been paralleled with the ducks, but never were. It seems as if the issue with leaving shallow symbols reflects any of this issues I have with this book, loose ends left untied. Other than that, this novel is one of the best Iíve read, and I think itíll stand against the test of time for decades to come.



ngl i wrote a little bit too much sorry yall

GabeWatson21@marist.com
marist guy


Feb 23, 2018
11:23 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I really enjoyed reading your book. I liked how we got to see all of Holdenís thoughts and emotions, and this style of writing made it easier to relate to Holden. All though I liked being able to view everything from Holdenís view point and getting to see his emotions and thought, I would have like to see more from the other characters as well. Another thing was Holdenís point of view. Holden has a very negative point of view towards other people. I would have liked to see more from the other characters, and I wish I was able to see how they view other people. Holden is always saying how other people are phonies. I wonder if some of the other characters, like Ackley, see people the same way as Holden. I also wanted to be able to see what other characters think of Holden. It was very interesting to see Holdenís thoughts on other characters, but I wish I was able to see other characterís thoughts on Holden. One thing that I liked about the novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was the symbolism throughout the novel. Many different objects were symbols for different themes and emotions for Holden. For instance, the red hunting hat is a symbol in the novel. This symbol relates to the theme, isolation as a form of self-protection because Holden wears the hat when he would like to be alone. Over all, I enjoyed the The Catcher in the Rye, however I disliked the way we could only see Holdenís point of view.



colleenkehoe21@marist.com
colleen kehoe


Feb 23, 2018
11:31 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

At the beginning of The Catcher in the Rye, I really liked the story. I thought Holden was pretty funny and I enjoyed listening to his random stream of consciousness. As the story progressed, Holdenís character started to bother me as he became more and more negative. He was being mean to people and only looked for the negatives in people. If Holden was a person in real life, I wouldnít hang out with him because he annoys me. However, I had to keep listening to him whine about his pneumonia and how bad Ackleyís teeth were. He is such a pessimistic and passive aggressive person that it does not take long to get annoyed by him. The other characters were better though. I think that Phoebe brought a happy ray of sunshine to the story, further adding to the contrast of childhood versus adulthood. The story and the way you wrote it is really good, I just donít really like Holden.



student@marist.com
bc


Feb 23, 2018
11:33 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I feel that the book The Catcher in the Rye was a decent book with both goods and bads. First, I think that some of the symbolism used seemed very unorthodox. I do not think that putting a hat on would change the way someone feels and make them want to be alone. Also, who is thinking about where the ducks in the lagoon go when the water freezes. I feel that people find books more enjoyable when they can relate to the main character, but with Holdenís actions and personality, it seemed difficult to connect with him. Also, I feel that you should have put more of Phoebe in person throughout the book because I was disappointed when Holden gives a great description about her, and we do not see all of it. I would have like a face to face encounter with D.B. to see if he is truly what Holden says he is or if Holden is exaggerating. Another thing I would have liked to see was meeting between Holden and his parents once they found out he was asked to leave another school. However, there were many positives as well. For instance, I enjoyed Phoebe as a character. She truly lightened up the story after it being very dark. I also liked your writing style. You were not afraid to curse to express something, but you did not say the ďfuck youĒ in every sentence. In conclusion, I think this was a good book that could have been better with a few minor tweaks.

michaelwilson21@marist.com
Michael Wilson


Feb 23, 2018
11:36 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,I feel that the book The Catcher in the Rye was a decent book with both goods and bads. First, I think that some of the symbolism used seemed very unorthodox. I do not think that putting a hat on would change the way someone feels and make them want to be alone. Also, who is thinking about where the ducks in the lagoon go when the water freezes. I feel that people find books more enjoyable when they can relate to the main character, but with Holdenís actions and personality, it seemed difficult to connect with him. Also, I feel that you should have put more of Phoebe in person throughout the book because I was disappointed when Holden gives a great description about her, and we do not see all of it. I would have like a face to face encounter with D.B. to see if he is truly what Holden says he is or if Holden is exaggerating. Another thing I would have liked to see was meeting between Holden and his parents once they found out he was asked to leave another school. However, there were many positives as well. For instance, I enjoyed Phoebe as a character. She truly lightened up the story after it being very dark. I also liked your writing style. You were not afraid to curse to express something, but you did not say the ďf youĒ in every sentence. In conclusion, I think this was a good book that could have been better with a few minor tweaks.

michaelwilson21@marist.com
Michael Wilson


Feb 23, 2018
2:48 PM

Hey J. D, I just read your book The Catcher in the Rye. First off, why is Holden so stubborn, I would have liked him to be a little more sensible and decisive. Also, why is Holden always never following through with what he does? It does not make much sense why he cannot just make a decision.



Sincerely,

Michael

student@marist.com
Michael b


Feb 23, 2018
2:50 PM

Hey my dude,

I hated your book, to be honest. I couldnít read a page without scrunching up my eyes in disgust. If men really think about women that way, Iíll go full lesbian. Iím already bi anyway. Holden is a total mess and does ridiculous things that most teenagers would never do. He even mistreated jane when she was sobbing in front of him. phoebe was cool but Holdenís a terrible person.

just no,

max

no@gmail.com
max


Feb 23, 2018
2:51 PM

Dear J.D. Salinger,

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your novel The Catcher in the Rye. I thought Holden was a very good representation of an average teenager. Though he is sometimes a complete idiot, he can be funny at times always going on his tangents and ranting about life. I do think that there could have been more to the ending, like maybe a little more detail on what happens to Holden. There could also be more about Jane Gallagher because she is just kind of floating in the background of the story the whole time, and she never really does anything. One thing I really did like was the symbolism of the carousel. Thereís the carousel horse on the cover, and you never really know what it means until near the very end of the book. I think itís it the one thing that stays constant in Holdenís life, and he can always come back to it unlike the museum, which he thought would never change. Also, to be honest, Holden is a complete hypocrite, like seriously he smokes what maybe two whole boxes of cigarettes in the whole novel, yet he criticizes others for it. How is it so impossible for Holden not to notice that he is the biggest phony there is. Maybe thatís why he notices all the other phonies then because they act in a similar way to him. Maybe heís hating on himself for acting that way, but he never tries to fix it. As a whole though, the book was pretty good.



elisaherrera21@marist.com
Elisa Herrera


Feb 23, 2018
2:52 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I liked the book real good

mylittlepony@gmail.com
Diego P


Feb 23, 2018
2:52 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Overall, this book was very interesting for teenagers because Holden is a very relatable teen for the most part. I donít really think your book needs to be banned because it exposes kids to the harsh reality of this world, and that is something a lot of kids arenít exposed to. Holdenís character was a little too dramatic to the point where he became a little too un relatable. I get that it makes the story more interesting for some, but it also would make it more interesting if he was more like average teenagers. Honestly, the ending of the book was not a very aha moment, instead it left me a little confused. Now I understand it was a flashback but I would have liked it better if he found his purpose because that was not expected out of him. Maybe this book would have done better if there was another book after this like a part 2. There could be a lot of extra information you could have added to that book. Also, I think if Holden was a more outgoing person who didnít seclude himself it would have been better. I liked your use of symbols throughout the book though. You integrated them very well into the novel, and it made me think. Sometimes the book got confusing because there were a lot of characters to keep in mind. I wish you went more in depth about Holdenís parents at home because that could have made it more relatable. I liked your book, it was probably my favorite book I have read this year.

studentatmarist.com
EF


Feb 23, 2018
2:53 PM



February 23, 2018

Dear J.D. Salinger,

I enjoyed your book The Catcher in the Rye. It was a good novel and I loved getting to learn about Holden and his daily life. I do have some questions about the book though. What ever happened to Jane, and why didnít Holden ever call her? Also what were Holdenís parentís reaction to him getting kicked out of school? I feel like they would be angry at him for dropping out of yet another school, but Iím not so sure. Also I wish you wrote more about Holdenís past and talked about Allie. I felt like this wouldíve allowed your audience to connect even more to Holden and sympathize with him more. But overall this book was really good, even though you shouldíve also left Ackley out. I disliked that character because the way he acted and thought he was so cool. But like I said overall the book was very good and it was fun getting to know Holden.



Sincerely,

Diego

DiegoPalmisano21@marist.com
Diego


Feb 23, 2018
2:53 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I enjoyed your novel The Catcher in the Rye. The beginning was kind of slow, but all in all, it was really good. It was so relatable and I connected to Holden and all your other characters quite a lot. Holden was so relatable in his actions. Sure, I donít think that everybody is phony and I do well in school, but I related to Holden because when Iím all grown up I donít want to lose my childhood sense of adventure, and become boring and phony. When Iím older I still want to go hiking and camping all the time and never stop doing that because I really love the outdoors.

Sincerely,

CB

student@marist.com
CB


Feb 23, 2018
2:53 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Overall I liked your novel. Holden was kind of annoying sometimes but mostly okay. Phoebe is my favorite character because sheís so sweet and innocent. all of the themes and symbols tie together so well. Holden not knowing where the duck in the central park go really relates back to him since he doesnít know where heís going once he leaves home and goes out on his own. Allies death really affected Holden which is revealed throughout the novel. I did not relate myself or my friends as much as I expected to any characters. I thought I would really see myself or others in a character but I didnít. I liked how the whole story was a flashback but we didnít realize it until the end. I hated the ending though. I wish we would have learned more about his life after his flashback. I donít understand why Holden cares so much about phoniness and losing innocence when he is phony. Him being a hypocrite was the most annoying thing about him. He would also go on long tangents that got boring. But it was good

student@marist.com
claire


Feb 23, 2018
2:53 PM

Overall, I didnít really like it. I thought most of the characters, especially Holden, were kind of annoying. I really hated how at the end we donít know what actually happened. I wanted to know his parentsí reaction once he finally returned home. Also, I feel like most of the time the same things were happening over and over again. I felt like Holden was always just hanging around in bars. I know that isnít true but not much else happened that was exciting enough to distract from that. I know that Holden was supposed to be relatable, but I could not really relate to much.

student at marist
MC


Feb 23, 2018
2:55 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I enjoyed your novel _The Catcher in the Rye_ that you wrote in 1951. The plot was well thought out and well written. Itís hard to believe Goodreads only gave you a 3.8/5. Oh well. My favorite part about the book was Holdenís humor and crazy ideas. He led people on wild goose chases, and lied to about half of New York City. His love for his siblings was cool, and his rebellious stage was inspiring. I did not like the ending. I wish we could have seen Holdenís mothers reaction to him being kicked out again and sneaking home. Overall, it was a very good book, and I would recommend it to friends.





Sincerely,

CB

student@marist
C.B.


Feb 23, 2018
2:55 PM

I thought your book was very enjoyable to read. The way you write made it sound just like a teenager would talk, which can be hard to do. Throughout the book I learned more about Holden and what he was really like. At times, I could relate to him. But at other times, he was making some dumb decisions. I like Holden overall as a character, just not some things he does. I also really liked Phoebe because she was young, but she was concerned for Holden and stayed true to herself. Anyway, by the end of the book, I was able to tell that Holden truly did have some issues. But, I really like how you ended the story. In the end, Holden was getting the help he needed and he was beginning to grow up which I believe was a fantastic resolution to the story. I wouldnít mind reading the book again and would recommend it to others.

fordwatson21@marist.com
Ford W


Feb 23, 2018
2:57 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Hello Mr. Salinger. I really enjoyed your book The Catcher in the Rye. I found how it renovates with teenager such as myself really well. Throughout the whole book, I really understood Holdenís situation. From his fear of failure to being an introvert who wants to be around people. I personally loved this ability to feel Holdenís emotion throughout the story although I didnít like the exaggeration of emotion of a teenager. But even that made me feel the atmosphere. Notice me Salinger Senpai.

Some kid from Marist
EeJ