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Nov 22, 2015
9:15 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,





Hi I just finished your book in my English class and I thought I was really amazing. It has really given me a different perspective on depression and how people deal with it in their day to day lives. At the end of The Catcher in the Rye Holden says never tell anyone anything because you will miss everyone. That leaves me with one question: did Holden ever contact the people he apparently misses? Throughout the entire book he says how much he hates everyone like Ackley and Stradlater does he ever get in touch?





-Jack Lavoie

jrlavoie301@gmail.com
Jack Lavoie


Nov 22, 2015
9:15 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,





Hi I just finished your book in my English class and I thought I was really amazing. It has really given me a different perspective on depression and how people deal with it in their day to day lives. At the end of The Catcher in the Rye Holden says never tell anyone anything because you will miss everyone. That leaves me with one question: did Holden ever contact the people he apparently misses? Throughout the entire book he says how much he hates everyone like Ackley and Stradlater does he ever get in touch?





-Jack Lavoie

jrlavoie301@gmail.com
Jack Lavoie


Nov 22, 2015
9:29 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I recently finished reading your book The Catcher in The Rye. It was a great read and, extremely relatable. After finishing the book a few main questions came to mind. Holden Caulfield captures the incertitude, innocence, and curiosity of adolescence. Who inspired Holden? Is he reflected off of your personality or someone that you know? Thank you for taking the time to read my letter.

Sincerely, Cassie Bush

cassie.bush64@gmail.com
Cassie Bush


Nov 22, 2015
10:03 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



After reading your novel, "Catcher in the Rye," I had a question. Would you consider calling Holden his own worst enemy? I myself believe he is, such as when he kept calling his roommate, Stradlater, a moron, egging him on to punch him in the face.



Thank you, Mr. Salinger,



Dylan Jacob

db15redsox@gmail.com
Dylan Jacob


Nov 22, 2015
10:33 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I recently completed the reading of Catcher in the Rye for my English class. I enjoyed it a lot. I like how you made the character of Holden speak as if he were a real person. You did a good job describing how the teenage years really are, displaying the struggles one faces while growing up and maturing. Not many authors do that. However I do have a few questions. Throughout the novel, it is implied that Holden is mentally unstable and is telling the story while in a mental institution. How come it was never formally written that Holden had a breakdown and was reciting his journey while in the mental institution and that he is actually there? The story ended at a point where Holden was happy, after finding happiness and innocence through his younger sister Phoebe. I would think that Holden would be somewhat happier and a little more stable after this scene. However, he has his breakdown shortly after. Approximately how long after does Holden have his official breakdown? Also, why does he breakdown? I thought he was feeling a tad bit better. I can tell throughout the story Holden does his best to interact with others however he ends up pushing them away. He describes Jane Gallagher with positive memories and qualities. He builds up the nerve to call her several times but never does, why is that? Did something happen between them to conclude why they really do not talk anymore? Was she pushed away as well? If Jane really is that important to him and understands him, how come she never makes an effort to call him? Overall, I really enjoyed the story.



Thank you,

Emma Shuster

emmashuster116@gmail.com
Emma Shuster


Nov 22, 2015
10:33 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I recently completed the reading of Catcher in the Rye for my English class. I enjoyed it a lot. I like how you made the character of Holden speak as if he were a real person. You did a good job describing how the teenage years really are, displaying the struggles one faces while growing up and maturing. Not many authors do that. However I do have a few questions. Throughout the novel, it is implied that Holden is mentally unstable and is telling the story while in a mental institution. How come it was never formally written that Holden had a breakdown and was reciting his journey while in the mental institution and that he is actually there? The story ended at a point where Holden was happy, after finding happiness and innocence through his younger sister Phoebe. I would think that Holden would be somewhat happier and a little more stable after this scene. However, he has his breakdown shortly after. Approximately how long after does Holden have his official breakdown? Also, why does he breakdown? I thought he was feeling a tad bit better. I can tell throughout the story Holden does his best to interact with others however he ends up pushing them away. He describes Jane Gallagher with positive memories and qualities. He builds up the nerve to call her several times but never does, why is that? Did something happen between them to conclude why they really do not talk anymore? Was she pushed away as well? If Jane really is that important to him and understands him, how come she never makes an effort to call him? Overall, I really enjoyed the story.



Thank you,

Emma Shuster

emmashuster116@gmail.com
Emma Shuster


Nov 22, 2015
10:35 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I recently completed the reading of Catcher in the Rye for my English class. I enjoyed it a lot. I like how you made the character of Holden speak as if he were a real person. You did a good job describing how the teenage years really are, displaying the struggles one faces while growing up and maturing. Not many authors do that. However I do have a few questions. Throughout the novel, it is implied that Holden is mentally unstable and is telling the story while in a mental institution. How come it was never formally written that Holden had a breakdown and was reciting his journey while in the mental institution and that he is actually there? The story ended at a point where Holden was happy, after finding happiness and innocence through his younger sister Phoebe. I would think that Holden would be somewhat happier and a little more stable after this scene. However, he has his breakdown shortly after. Approximately how long after does Holden have his official breakdown? Also, why does he breakdown? I thought he was feeling a tad bit better. I can tell throughout the story Holden does his best to interact with others however he ends up pushing them away. He describes Jane Gallagher with positive memories and qualities. He builds up the nerve to call her several times but never does, why is that? Did something happen between them to conclude why they really do not talk anymore? Was she pushed away as well? If Jane really is that important to him and understands him, how come she never makes an effort to call him? Overall, I really enjoyed the story.



Thank you,

Emma Shuster

emmashuster116@gmail.com
Emma Shuster


Nov 21, 2015
5:42 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,Ever since finishing your book one main question had been on my mind. Why has Jane never tried to contact Holden? Many times through the book Holden contemplated trying to contact Jane and say hello and re build a relationship with her. However, Jane seems to make no effort to help Holden, even though she knows what he used to be like and how he has negatively changed. Why is that? Was Jane not close enough to Holden to realise he needed help? And when she went on a date with Stradlater, did she do it because it was The school Holden went to or did she not even know where Holden was?

Thank you,

Gabby Khan

Mrs.Leonard Pd 3

meowmeowmeowmeow17@gmail.com
Gabby K


Nov 20, 2015
3:24 PM

I very much enjoyed the novel, having the ability to covey the truest and rawest form of depression. Giving insight and a sense of understanding to readers across the world to a very real problem.

Sasha_Laredo10@HotMail.com
Sasha Laredo


Nov 20, 2015
7:24 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Why did you make Holden so depressed? Is there a little bit of you in his character? If so what moment in your life was inspirational for you in the writing of this book and character?

Simone Hicks

Lori Leonard

Hon English 10-Pd. 4

simonemaisonhicks@yahoo.com
Simone Hicks


Oct 08, 2015
2:57 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger, Whats up?

domenictringale@aol.com
divesh patel


Feb 26, 2015
1:26 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Thank You. All is well.



M.M.N.

onestepbeyond@live.com
Macada Mukwa Ninni (Black Bear Man)


Nov 15, 2014
5:09 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I really enjoyed you book, it was very relatable and truly a success. But, why exactly was Holden sent to the mental institution? Holden is a very unique and special character that many teens can relate to even to this day.



-Amanda Bergner

Aberg1029@gmail.com

Aberg1029@gmail.com
Amanda Bergner


Nov 15, 2014
11:32 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I enjoyed your book, The Catcher in the Rye. I am a bit curious, is the book supposed to be about how you felt when you were that age? Do you relate to the book? Were you trying to get these feelings off of your chest when you wrote the book? Or did you just want to write a story and you thought of it all on the spot? I thought it was a great idea to provide so much background information in the novel. It let the reader connect more with Holden, which allowed the reader to think more and interpret the novel better. Once again, I thoroughly enjoyed the novel, and thank you for writing it!

Sincerely, Andrew Gordon

andrewpgordon7@gmail.com
Andrew Gordon


Nov 14, 2014
12:57 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Who is Holden Caulfield? Who does he represent? Is he you? How was he created? Why was he created?





Dimitri Guynn Pd2

Dimitriguynn@yahoo.com
Dimitriguynn@yahoo.com


Nov 14, 2014
1:16 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Was writing this book a way of getting your views out to the world? Why did you write such a hypocritical character? Was it to show how similar everyone truly was in this time period? Does Holden eventually realize that he is phony too and change how he acts? As for Holden refusing to grow up, was this how you felt entering adulthood?

madelinevu812@gmail.com
Madeline Vu - Pd.2


Nov 14, 2014
1:16 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Was writing this book a way of getting your views out to the world? Why did you write such a hypocritical character? Was it to show how similar everyone truly was in this time period? Does Holden eventually realize that he is phony too and change how he acts? As for Holden refusing to grow up, was this how you felt entering adulthood?

madelinevu812@gmail.com
Madeline Vu - Pd.2


Nov 14, 2014
1:17 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



Was writing this book a way of getting your views out to the world? Why did you write such a hypocritical character? Was it to show how similar everyone truly was in this time period? Does Holden eventually realize that he is phony too and change how he acts? As for Holden refusing to grow up, was this how you felt entering adulthood?

madelinevu812@gmail.com
Madeline Vu - Pd.2


Nov 14, 2014
1:19 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



After reading your novel, Catcher in the Rye, one question was left in mind,was Holden ever actually "cured"? Did he ever end up being able to go back to his family, and live happily, and accepting the fact that change happens in life, and he must adjust rather than dwell?

gracerozek@gmail.com
Gracie Rozek


Nov 14, 2014
2:34 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I am reading Catcher in the Rye in english class right now and have a lot of questions about it. What I wonder the most is, how did you come up with this story? and does this story relate to you? I would really like to find out because I believe it would help me understand Holden more if it relates to your own experiences. Thank you so much for your amazing book you have changed literary history. Because of this book, characters are portrayed very differently now instead of being perfect with no problems.

Thank you so much,

Greta Leissa

gretagal@verizon.net
Greta Leissa


Nov 14, 2014
3:42 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger, Did you create the character Holden Caulfield to reflect your own personal sadness about something or was the character Holden Caulfield not related at all to your personal feelings?

s101may@yahoo.com
Sarah Levy


Nov 14, 2014
3:43 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger, Did you create the character Holden Caulfield to reflect your own personal sadness about something or was the character Holden Caulfield not related at all to your personal feelings?

s101may@yahoo.com
Sarah Levy


Nov 14, 2014
12:08 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I enjoyed your novel. It was very real to life.

But what i want to know is, what inspired you to write "The Catcher in the Rye"? How were you able to come up with all your intricate details, characters, and plot ideas. the detail you used in your book were just amazing.

Another question i have for you is, did you really write this book from your real life experiences?

How come Holden never explains his mental breakdown? He just left it hanging, and it really made we wonder what actually happened.



Thank you for your time and I wish you all my Best,

buggyboy33@aol.com
Alexi Tzamaras Leonard Pd.8


Nov 14, 2014
12:28 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I truly fell in love with your novel, "The Catcher in the Rye." I connected with Holden in my own experiences which made me love the book even more. I felt connected towards Holden with his loneliness around people, as I am sure many other teenagers did as well. It helps us high school students feel as if we might not be the craziest people in the world. Holden is truly unlike any other character I have read in any other novels which interests me even more. Thank you for writing an amazing novel that I loved and connected with.

sydthesquid17@gmail.com
Sydney Plummer


Nov 14, 2014
2:41 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Holden is so easy to relate to for so many people, especially teens. He is understanding. He is one of us. So, why is it that all of us are not in mental institutions? What makes him different from the rest of us?

caitlindeerin@gmail.com
Caitlin Deerin