----------------------------------------------------Chris Kubica, Webmaster

 

 

There are 4916 letters to Salinger posted here and counting!
[FirstPage] [Prev] Showing page 3 of 197 pages[Next] [LastPage]

 

Feb 23, 2018
2:58 PM

Dear Jerald,





Dear J.D. Salinger,

Your book, The Catcher in the Rye, was a very interesting novel and it was very easy to relate to. I was greatly able to connect with Holden because we are both teenage boys and have similar mindsets. Although, some of Holden’s decision making was quite hard to read, for I could never see any in modern day making dumb decisions like those. Next, the ending of the story was quite difficult to comprehend, and some of the symbols and themes were a little confusing. Why did Holden want to stay in his childhood and be a “catcher in the rye”, but he chose to smoke and drink in his free time? The theme of the painfulness of adulthood is portrayed in this case, and it is never greatly explained. Lastly, a symbol that I found confusing was the baseball mitt. I know the mitt reminded Holden of Allie, but it was never truly mentioned again in the text. All in all, The Catcher in the Rye was a great book, however, many parts were hard to read and quite confusing.



sharkeisha123@marist.com
marist student


Feb 23, 2018
2:58 PM

Dear Mr. Salinger,

Your book was pretty terrible. I’m sorry, but I have to admit I dreaded reading that every night for homework. It put me in such a horrible mood. To be honest, I’m being hard on you because you’re dead. Otherwise, I would have lied and said it was all right. But it isn’t. Has it ever occurred to you that Holden is the whiniest most pathetic character in the whole world? I swear, Mr. Salinger, if I ever hear the word phony again I might cry. And are you kidding me? He never called Jane? What the heck. The truth is, the life lessons you are trying to get across aren’t that bad; I was actually pretty fond of the catcher in the rye symbolism. It’s just that your symbolism and themes are so redundant they make me want to cut your book up into a million pieces. If the book was more about Phoebe, I would have liked it. She was my favorite.



Sincerely,

Anna

AnnaKalbas21@marist.com
Anna Kalbas


Feb 23, 2018
2:59 PM

Hello Mr. Salinger, my name is Will and I have recently read your novel titled The Catcher in the Rye. I wanted to write in regards to the questionable story line in this novel. In the big picture, I found the story to be quite bland and generally uninteresting. I did find Holden and his character to be quite interesting. He has an oddball personality and it is interesting how he interacts with others. Other than that, the story was not pleasure to read in any way, and it was an awful cliffhanger. The story was hard to follow, and there were just no significant events that really did it for me. I was uninterested after the second chapter and I also strongly dislike most of the characters and once again, the story was very bland. There was really no formal climax and there were no entertaining events that would make me interested in any way. Thanks for trying but it just didn’t do it for me.

student@marist.com
Will Lanford


Feb 23, 2018
3:01 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Wuss Poppin J.D.

Jimbo@Jimail.com
Jimbo


Feb 23, 2018
3:01 PM

Dear J.D. Salinger,

Thank you for writing this book. It is a true work of art and masterpiece of literature. I really enjoyed following Holden on his journey, but i did not like the repetition of Holden finding women and ditching them. I felt as if that tarnished Holden’s reputation in an unnecessary way. I loved learning about DB, Phoebe, and Jane. I thought it was clever how you slowly revealed that Holden was retelling this story, and it was not in present tense. I appreciated the incorporation of the themes of the painfulness of growing up because this was very relatable. If you have some time, any time, I would love to share some ideas about how to make you the da Vinci of all authors.

Thanks,

Lil Toenail

P.S. the title of this story steaming hot garbage

JackLloyd21@marist.com
Lil Toenail


Feb 23, 2018
3:02 PM

Dear J.D. Salinger,

Thank you for writing this book. It is a true work of art and masterpiece of literature. I really enjoyed following Holden on his journey, but i did not like the repetition of Holden finding women and ditching them. I felt as if that tarnished Holden’s reputation in an unnecessary way. I loved learning about DB, Phoebe, and Jane. I thought it was clever how you slowly revealed that Holden was retelling this story, and it was not in present tense. I appreciated the incorporation of the themes of the painfulness of growing up because this was very relatable. If you have some time, any time, I would love to share some ideas about how to make you the da Vinci of all authors.

Thanks,

Lil Toenail

P.S. the title of this story steaming hot garbage

JackLloyd21@marist.com
Lil Toenail


Jan 05, 2018
1:25 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

You know what it is patna! Real talk! Capturing that teen angst baby baby! You did it best! True gangsta! Man, that postmodern style of yours-using slang or "vulgar" language, stream of consciousness, informal and unreliable voice, etc.-it got that theme of disenfrachised angsty youth on deck and locked it there, nah mean? You one humorist too, homie! Can you believe how many times these characters got to me? dag!

Your famous novel captured the voice of a youngin that we can all relate to; even us oldbloods, who forgot what the game was, ya feel? You a kung fu masta! Cant wait to see your next freestyle! And see you next Labor Day, dad!

Your son,

Chef Vortivask (an innocent man)

bonillachris98@gmail.com
Chef Vortivask


Feb 24, 2017
6:22 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Please have my babies

ismayonaiseanistrument@dabomb.com
Loquarious McDarious Showahandlethefourth V


Feb 23, 2017
7:27 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I loved your book about the teenage persona. I could really see myself thinking the thing Holden does. Observing people and their behaviors is really fun is interesting. I would love to meet you in real life, but it seems you have kicked the bucket. That sucks. I find it really impressive that you have written a book that has actually been banned in a couple states. Awesome job!



Sincerely,

Sean Hatten

seanhatten20@marist.com
Sean Hatten


Feb 23, 2017
7:43 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

i LOVE YOU!

I HOPE YOU RECIEVE THIS IS HEAVEN

MWUAH@MARIST.COM
MITCHELL oWEN


Feb 23, 2017
7:54 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Hey really enjoyed the book. It was very relatable to the teenage mind and thinking process. I really enjoyed Holden as a character and his family. He seemed to symbolize the teenager of today. I hope from beyond the grave, you inspired someone to continue to write the series. The cursing was awesome! I love to curse, and this book had so many phosphate’ words in it. Good read and great job relating Holden’s problems to teenagers today!

From,

DJ Lil South

boibye@gmail.com
DJ Lil South


Dec 01, 2015
1:49 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I loved your novel "The Catcher in the Rye"! I thought it was very well written with all of its literary devices and symbolism. I have a few questions. Did you ever think you were just like Holden at one put in your life? Second question I have is, why do you not want this book to be made into a movie? The last question I have is, is it true that there is a second book to "The Catcher in the Rye"? Overall I really enjoyed this novel and hope that there truly is a second book.

missyvonmis@hotmail.com
Stasha Galczynski


Nov 24, 2015
4:47 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

At the end of the novel, I wish the explanation of how Holden actually got to the mental hospital was included. I understand that at the end of the book he decides he has said everything he wants to say, but the ending felt unfulfilling. I wanted to know if Holden ever accepts the fact that he has to grow up and face adulthood. It would have been interesting to read about how he overcomes and finally understands his misconceptions about innocence. I wonder if Holden ever got over Allies death. I am guessing he did not. He seemed to dwell on that topic consistently throughout the novel. I can understand why you would end the book without Holden overcoming everything he goes through, because it is unrealistic to think that he could have conquered his depression, anxiety, and post traumatic stress disorder. The ending could also leave the possibilities as a mystery to the reader, which I think is pretty unique. Holden was an intriguing and captivating character that had a refreshing and different outlook on the world around him.

baileykelhan@gmail.com
Kelhan Bailey


Nov 23, 2015
12:25 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I would like to start by asking if you had ever predicted that your life would be similar to Holden in regard to isolationism. Holden was deeply troubled from symptoms of depression, bipolar personality, and boarder line personality disorder, but were these used to their intended effect? As the novel develops Holden sinks further into the hole he has dug, almost as though it were his own grave. The abruptness of the ending of the novel does initially startle readers, but it reveals much about Holden and his own resistance to share about his mental illnesses and their affect on his life. Did you, at any point in the novel, write from your own life experiences with mental illnesses? The underling sadness that Holden carries causes him to feel alienated from the rest of society, and it is a reoccurring theme throughout the entire story. His depression leads to feelings of homelessness and displacement as he suggests by asking several cab drivers is they know where the ducks go to in the winter. Also, his desire to return to innocence, when is brother Allie was alive, is highlighted by when he takes Phoebe to the park and sees her on the carousel. Thank you for your time and consideration in reading this letter.

Sincerely,

Stella Morales, 10 Honors English, Period 3, Question 28.

stellablue.morales@gmail.com
Stella Morales


Nov 23, 2015
12:41 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I feel that my life and my experiences are very similar to what Holden was going through, through out Catcher In The Rye. It has become one of my new favorite novels because of the similarities that I share with the protagonist. However, I feel that in order to truly set Holden as a piece of fiction or reality in my mind, I need to know how much Holden resembles you. The more he does relate to you, the more real his hardships and experiences will feel to me, and therefore make it more meaningful to me. While, as of now, I view Holden as a very real example of what some teenagers, like me, are going through, it would be amazing if you could tell me how much he actually does relate to yourself. As, same with Holden, I sometimes have trouble moving on and accepting the future to come. This book has definitely helped me put my life in a new perspective, and for that, I thank you.



35080@mcpsmd.net
Abby Callas


Nov 23, 2015
12:46 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I just finished your book, and very much enjoyed it. I was wondering what caused you to make a character like Holden, who is depressed and has a million problems that can not really be solved. Did it at all relate to your personal life through yourself or somebody you knew? Thanks for your time.



Chad Carlson

chadder1234@gmail.com
Chad Carlson


Nov 23, 2015
2:35 AM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I have a few questions about "Catcher in the Rye" Why would Holden go specifically to New York rather than to go west if he wants to go there anyway? And why did not he just go sneak into his house earlier to see Phoebe instead of waiting until the end of the book" I know that he did not want to confront his parents but he could have snuck into his house when he first left Pencey. I highly enjoyed the book and found it very interesting with all the turning events.

From,

Sammie

sammmiebutton@verizon.net
SammieB


Nov 23, 2015
2:26 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

Hi, I just read your book and I was really confused at first but as the book went on I started to understand it better. The one question I want to ask you is, what made you write this book? Or why did you decide to write this book? I wanted to ask you this because this book was very interesting and a very unique story. Your story is pretty powerful and very worth reading. The symbols you put in were pretty easy to figure out. I like how if you figure out the symbols then you will figure out the story and I think that is pretty cool. The last thing I want to say is I hope my question can be answered.

Zimmboy98@Gmail.com
Sammy Dickstein


Nov 23, 2015
2:26 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,



I have just finished reading The Catcher in the Rye. I must say that it was one of the best books I have ever read. I just have one question, are any of the characters in the novel based off of people in your life? I was wondering this because there are many characters that have such distinct personalities. You make them come to life and describe them as if they were real people.



Sincerely,



Andrew Christianson

997539@mcpsmd.net
Andrew Christianson


Nov 23, 2015
3:21 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger, the "Catcher in The Rye" is a very interesting book it makes you really start to think about your life and your personality after reading the book. Holden is a very interesting person, but i wanna know why he is so judgmental?I also want to know why he is so depressed? also why does he think his parents dont care about him?

mitch.mbanong123@gmail.com
Mitchel Mbanong


Nov 23, 2015
3:23 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger, the "Catcher in The Rye" is a very interesting book it makes you really start to think about your life and your personality after reading the book. Holden is a very interesting person, but i wanna know why he is so judgmental?I also want to know why he is so depressed? also why does he think his parents dont care about him?

325564@mcpsmd.net
Mitchel Mbanong


Nov 23, 2015
5:24 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I love your book. It is fanatastically written and it shows how the world is not perfect. I love how I can really relate to Holden. I can relate to hating phoniness, but also being phony at the same time. I love the irony when a person talks about hating when someone does something, and turns around and does it. It just shows the flaws of the human self.

I am very interested in the relationship between Jane and Holden. If I had the chance to meet you, I would make an interesting request. I would ask you to write a short story on the full story of what happened in Maine on the trip Allie died. I am very interested to see how you would make Jane react. To me, her reaction would define her as a character.

Thank you for sharing your amazing work with the world.

-Nick Costa

nickc1311@gmail.com
Nick costa


Nov 23, 2015
7:57 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I appreciate that your writing shows people who are going through

depression that there is still hope. Your novel has inspired many people to see

happiness even when all they see is darkness. This comment is in

reference to when Holden is going through his stages of depression over

Allies death and the only thing that made him genuinely happy was his

sister Phoebe.



Ms. Leonard

Honors English 10-Period 3

kat.nehrbass@gmail.com
Katherine Nehrbass


Nov 23, 2015
9:08 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I was just wondering who was Holden inspired by? Is he inspired by your personalitly or is he inspired by someone that you know?

hallie.kling123@gmail.com
Hallie Kling


Nov 23, 2015
9:10 PM

Dear J. D. Salinger,

I really liked your book, "The Catcher in the Rye". I learned about certain things in life that I did not know existed. Many things came to mind when I read this book and I thought of some things I should ask you. What did people think/say about the book when it first came out? Did parents think it was too inappropriate for there kids to be reading? Also, I was wondering if this story was about something that happened in your life? I was not able to fully connect to many things in the story to something that happened to me but whenever Holden was with Phoebe and thinking about Allie I was fully connected and it touched me.





From,

Ronald Little

ronaldslittle2@gmail.com
Ronald Little